Takeda Pharmaceuticals

Northwestern University

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Publications

  • Head of Takeda Digital Accelerator – USA (April 2015 – Present)
  • Associate Director, Cross-Brand Relationship Marketing (January 2013 – Present)
  • Senior Manager, CRM Strategy and Operations (August 2011 – January 2013)
  • Sales/Payer Strategies Product Manager (November 2010 – August 2011)
  • B.A., Environmental Science & Biology
  • M.B.A., Marketing, Biotechnology, Technology Management (Kellogg School of Management)
  • Marketing
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Biotechnology
  • Computer Science
  • General Aviation (Licensed Private Pilot)
  • Web Design and Development

About Daniel J. Gandor

Dan Gandor is an accomplished “intrapreneur” and pharmaceutical marketer with expertise in both small molecules and biopharmaceuticals, along with deep brand launch experience. He possesses significant leadership experience and is an effective manager with an established, results-driven reputation. Presently serving as the Head of Takeda’s Digital Accelerator in the U.S., Dan is based in the greater Chicago area.

In his current role with Takeda, Dan spearheads the company’s efforts to identify opportunities for game-changing digital disruption within healthcare in order to better support and activate patients in managing their diseases and treatments. Takeda’s Digital Accelerator not only explores digital futures, but supports scalable experiments to pinpoint and accelerate best practices, thereby catalyzing innovation.

Dan Gandor’s professional track record reveals digital in his DNA, and he consistently displays a natural aptitude to strategize and facilitate positive change. Prior to his current position, Dan successfully built a team from the ground up around new core competencies in Relationship Marketing, Multi-Channel Marketing, and customer-centric marketing. He has led a variety of large-scale pharmaceutical marketing initiatives and teams, including commercial merger/acquisition integrations. He has also provided critical program leadership to rollouts of major technological platforms like the iPad and Veeva.

Dan has devoted his career to pharmaceuticals and medical devices in large part because of the incredible potential for positive change the life science space provides. He has always loved creating transformative change, and to know that his work has the potential to touch millions of patients down the line is an incredible privilege.

Dan Gandor holds an MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, the institution from which he also earned his undergraduate degree in Environmental Science and Biology. His graduate education spanned three separate majors: Marketing, Biotechnology, and Technology Marketing.

Dan was born and raised on the northwest side of Chicago – the Jefferson Park neighborhood, to be exact. He attended St. Robert Bellarmine for grade school and then Notre Dame College Prep in Niles, Illinois for high school. Outside of work, Dan enjoys spending time with his family, web design, baseball, and general aviation. He earned his private pilot’s license in 2008 and maintains an aviation blog that documents his flying experiences.

Learn More

How Digital Health Is Giving Power Back to the Consumer

According to Pew Research, almost two-thirds of American adults own a smartphone, nearly double the 35% of respondents that indicated they did just five years ago. Naturally, with more smartphones in the pockets of Americans across the country, the capabilities of our devices continues to grow. The capabilities of digital health on our devices is no exception, as its continued expansion and growth has resulted in some impressive numbers–namely that 66 percent of smartphone users indicated they would use a mobile health app. For the first time, the power of monitoring, measuring and analyzing your health is being put back into your own hands thanks to the digital health revolution. But it, like everything else entrusted to the public, is not without its questions and limitations, at least seemingly. A huge and looming factor when it comes to putting the power of health into the hands of the consumer is trust; more specifically, will people trust their phones to accurately measure how healthy they are, and trust themselves to accurately interpret it? As it turns out, the answer to that question may already be a firm “yes.” According to Forbes, the ease and convenience of digital health devices like wearables or mobile apps is beginning to outweigh the expertise and comfort of in-person physician visits, as more and more people are opting to put their health in the hands of their smartphones. Only a few years ago, the idea of relying on your cell phone to manage your health would be largely unheard of; ask any Baby Boomer or Traditionalist about their feelings on putting their health in the...

Why “Digital Marketing” is a Misnomer

  When you write an email to your friend, are you digital writing, or are you just writing? When you read a book on your Kindle or Nook, are you digital reading, or are you just reading? When you pay your bills online, are you digital paying, or are you just paying? If you’re anything like the rest of the world, you probably answered that you’re writing, reading and paying–the word “digital” doesn’t need to be attached to everything done digitally. Why then do we call online advertising, social media, search engine optimization and online conversions “digital marketing?” In reality, they should be referred to as “marketing in a digital world” if you absolutely must include the word “digital”.  The phrase digital marketing serves as a misnomer that frankly is unnecessary in today’s world. I’ll admit that even I am guilty of this, caving to the pressures of established online verbiage, using the term a couple of times in my own writing. However, it doesn’t take away from the fact that in the most basic sense, “digital marketing” is simply a product of industry jargon, the need to attach meaningless modifiers to already existing terms. Modifiers like “digital,” as in “digital health,” are hugely important when they’re actually functioning as modifiers. Digital health encompasses broad landscape that sits at the intersection of emerging digital technologies and the molecular biology of how our bodies and health function. Digital health, then, is distinctly different from healthcare in a broader sense. (Although let’s see if, in about five years, the phrase “digital health” is a similar outdated misnomer.) Much of the difference...

The Intersection of Digital Health and Digital Marketing

The Digital Revolution, as it is sometimes called, has made a lasting mark on mankind. The widespread development and subsequent adoption of digital technologies as they became available during the 1980’s was, in a word, prolific. Perhaps even more notably, the digitization of the modern world hasn’t slowed down one bit since getting its legs in the 60’s and 70’s – it’s only continued to gain traction. Inventions and ideas formerly relegated to science-fiction movies, TV shows, and comic books are now a reality. Now, less than 40 years later, the world has truly gone digital as we set foot deeper and deeper into the information age. Our capabilities have grown and morphed further than we could have conceptualized in the past as more and more facets of human life are beginning to go digital. Digital Health As with most everything else during a worldwide digital proliferation, the way we approach healthcare and pharma has taken on digital legs of its own. Mobile health apps, fitness trackers, online diagnostic tools and data-driven health tracking systems present just a small taste of the possibilities that the field of Digital Health encompasses. New and innovative technological breakthroughs are rolled out seemingly every day, lending more and more credibility and weight to the expanding Digital Health field. The evolution of healthcare into Digital Health continues to unfurl in front of our eyes. As the technology behind Digital Health grows and expands, so too do practitioners’ views on it.  In the same way that few people anticipated automobiles or home computers would be a necessary technology now, more and more people are beginning...